After 3.11

Hiroshima to Fukushima: Japanese Performing Arts after 3.11

PROJECT INFO

本研究は、3.11以降、地震と津波という目に見える天災と、放射能汚染という目に見えない人災が舞台に表象された/されなかったのかを検証し、表象も修復も不可能なカタストロフとトラウマに向き合う芸術の社会的役割を批評する。東日本大震災の瓦礫の山は、広島・長崎の恐怖を蘇らせると共に、世界有数の地震国にして被爆国が世界有数の原発依存国になった理由を改めて問い直す契機となった。「時代の鏡」とされ、本質的に可視の表象物である舞台芸術が、時に世論に従い、あるいは抗いながら、不可視の核をいかに投影、歪曲、変容、昇華、隠蔽してきたのかを考察する。

This research project examines how visible natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis, and invisible human disasters such as radioactive contamination are represented (or not) in the Japanese performing arts since 3.11.2011. Our purpose is to examine the social role of performance in mediating catastrophe, a phenomenon whose trauma often seems to exist beyond representation or repair.

The mountain of debris left in the wake of the Great East Japan earthquake and radiation releases from the ruptured Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, triggered memories of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and prompted reflection on why the only country to have witnessed atomic bombings, and one of the world's most earthquake-prone lands, became one of the world's leading nuclear-powered societies.

The driving question behind this project is how the performing arts, which are representational by nature, have portrayed this invisible catastrophe by twisting, distorting, transforming, sublimating, concealing, and also resisting and protesting the discourses surrounding its presence.

Researchers

Mika Eglinton: Mika is a performing arts researcher, critic and journalist. She is professor of English theatre and cultural studies at Kobe University of Foreign Studies. She is also actively involved in the creation of theatre as a translator, dramaturg and facilitator.

Andrew Eglinton: Andrew is a theatre writer, researcher and lecturer in performance studies at Konan Women’s University. He is a regular contributor to the Japan Times culture section.


本研究はJSPS科研費16K13190の助成を受けたものです。
This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K13190

PROJECT NEWS

Info on project events and publications

Nguyen Trinh Thi Film Screening and Lecture

Mika Eglinton invited Nguyen Trinh Thi, a Hanoi-based independent filmmaker, documentarian and video artist, to show two of her works, Letters From Panduranga (2015) and Jo Ha Kyu (2012) followed by a lecture/presentation reflecting on the theme of nuclear power and its connection to society through art, particularly film.

(Dis)embodying Woyzeck in Osaka in the case of Taihen

Conference: Performance Studies international – PSi #20 Tohoku Paper title: “(Dis)embodying Woyzeck in Osaka in the case of Taihen” Dates: 28 August – 1 September 2015 Venue: Aomori Museum of Art Keywords: the body, disability, Fukushima, contamination, nuclear power Abstract In her essay titled “Foucault and the Paradox of Bodily Inscriptions,” Judith Butler asks ‘what […]

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